Helpline: 0808 800 0303

Search form

Picturing Parkinson's - a scientific art form

The winner of Picturing Parkinson's - Supernova by Philipp Berg

Today we announce the top images in our 2015 Picturing Parkinson's competition, celebrating the beauty and art in the research we fund.

The winning photograph – Supernova by Philipp Berg from the University of Cambridge - is pictured above.

It's great that they can unpick the complexities of Parkinson's science and provide images that give us a different perspective on how we're working to develop new and better treatments.

Dr Arthur Roach, Research Director, Parkinson's UK

We held the competition in memory of scientist Dr Jonathan Stevens, who had Parkinson's and passed away at the age of 34 in December 2013.

The remarkable images below, taken during cutting-edge Parkinson's research, reveal the complexities of the millions of nerve cells that make up our brains.

View the top 10 images from our 2015 Picturing Parkinson's image competition on Flickr:

Brian Stevens, Jonathan's father, who judged the entries with his family, said:

"It's a privilege to judge this competition, which showcases the complexity of Parkinson's research in a unique way. Jonathan was passionate about making research accessible and easy to understand, and we're honoured that this competition helps to do this.

"As a scientist, Jonathan was an avid support of Parkinson's research and communicating the advances in the area to help inspire other people with Parkinson's."

Parkinson's research in a different light

Parkinson's UK's Research Director Dr Arthur Roach said of the winners:

"Irish writer Jonathan Swift once said vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others – this is what our Parkinson's researchers are doing each day in the lab, discovering new scientific breakthroughs and taking us closer to a cure.

"It's great that they can unpick the complexities of Parkinson's science and provide images that give us a different perspective on how we're working to develop new and better treatments. They are proving that science is beautiful."

Related content

Share this