Back to top

11 years on.

20 posts / 0 new
Last post
Bredbu
11 years on.
Bredbu

Well,here I am, 11 years on since being told that the "trapped nerve" that I thought I had was PD. It was a shock and it took at least 3 weeks to get my head around it. I established that we as a family were going to be open about it so that when I took longer to put my seat belt on,put notes in my wallet and the endless daily tasks that do require a modicum of dexterity that you seem to have lost at least people knew.

Yes,life has changed in those eleven years,but I have a wife of 46 years of being together and our motto is we will focus on what we can do and not struggle with what we cannot. More planning,more flexibility and a change of lifestyle means that we have still a wonderful lifestyle, and yes I do have 18 tablets a day but I am still able to enjoy every,well almost,everyday to a degree. Positive attitude is what you should try to obtain. Not always possible but the more you use it the better times you have.

daffy

What a lovely positive post from someone 11 years on. I was diagnosed last year. As you say acceptance takes a while. There are good times and some not so good. As you said a positive frame of mind makes a world of difference. My husband is very supportive which helps a lot but sometimes having PD feels a pretty lonely path to tread  reading your post gave me quite a lift. Thanks

DivineR

Thanks Bredbu, 

Just had a bit of a wobble today about the future, (which I normally don't look too far ahead). You're positive post has got me back on track. 

Good to hear you're making the best out of your life! 

daffy

Hi DivineR

I think an occasional wobble is probably normal. Sounds like you're coping really well with a recent diagnosis. It seemed to take me ages to get back on level ground, even though I'd had symptoms for several years and long suspected the initial diagnosis of essential tremor was really PD. I agree keeping positive is the best answer.

I have also found that now I'm more inclined to try new things rather than dither about it. I'd wanted to keep bees for years. Now I've joined the local club&have a hive

DivineR

Hi again,

yes I think life throws you curveballs. I read somewhere not to think about what you used to be able to do and concentrate on what you can do now. Something for me to try to live by. 

daffy

Hi, That sounds like good advice - I should think it's a lot easier said than done though. I'll give it a go.

Mind you I have a bit of a theory that an occasional wobble now and then helps "balance me out a bit" and so hopefully reduce the chances of a major wobble!

 

 

 

 

benji

I guess from your post Bredbu that you were  diagnosed in your 60's.Would you have the same  positive outlook now if you had been diagnosed in your 40's?

MrJohnnyParky

Hi Bredbu, like your positive outlook and  don't panic just passing through. DR we all wobble and I read that somewhere once to and helped me adjust. Now I remember it was a post by DivineR when I was wobbling often myself. Sure she'll guide you in the right direction.

MrJohnnyParky

P.S  never thanked you properly for the poem DR, so THANK YOU and I saved it. Best go as ìn my 40's and feeling posit....midly ok. Keep going Bredbu.

DivineR

Hi JP, 

I still think I read it somewhere else. I can't claim it. Hope you are well! 

Benji, I was diagnosed at 50, clearly having symptoms for a few years before. I really think it's maybe more important for young onset Pders to have (or try) to have a positive attitude. Don't get me wrong, it's really hard but rather that than doom and gloom. This is our reality, living with it 24/7. A look on the bright side gets me through the day. (I don't mean PD, there's no bright side,  but life) 

Pages