Assessment of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s (PD-MCI)

This set of resources, comprised of a clinical algorithm and a set of Critically Appraised Topics (CATs), provides clinicians with an approach to routine cognitive assessment based on the best current evidence, clinical expertise and an understanding of the individual’s values and perspective.

Last reviewed
Topic
  • Access to multi-disciplinary teams
  • Anticipatory / advanced care
  • Care strategies
  • Information from diagnosis
  • Mental health
  • Patient involvement
  • Service improvement
  • Social care
  • Symptoms
  • Treatments and medication
Resource type
  • Publications
Profession
  • All professions
  • Care manager
  • Care worker
  • Dietitian
  • Doctor (Geriatrician)
  • Doctor (GP)
  • Doctor (Neurologist)
  • Doctor (Other)
  • GP
  • Healthcare Assistant
  • Nurse (other)
  • Nurse (Parkinson's nurse)
  • Occupational therapist
  • Pharmacist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Psychiatrist
  • Psychologist
  • Social care assessor
  • Social worker
  • Speech and language therapist
Stage
  • Complex
  • Diagnosis
  • End of life
  • Maintenance

Clinical algorithm: Assessment of mild cognitive impairment

This is a single-page, quick-reference algorithm to help clinicians assess mild cognitive impairment in a person with Parkinson’s. Derived by multidisciplinary consensus and to address gaps in current clinical guidelines, it is designed to be printed and kept conveniently to hand in the consultation room. The evidence underpinning the algorithm is presented as an accompanying series of Critically Appraised Topics (CATs).

The algorithm is not designed to be applied rigidly, but to be used as an optional starting point for decision making around this complex element of care. Individual clinicians and people affected by Parkinson’s may need to tailor their approach depending on their particular experience and values. 

How to use the clinical algorithm 

The algorithm is designed as an optional starting point for decision making. Individual clinicians and people affected by Parkinson’s may need to tailor their approach depending on their particular experience and values.

It has two sections: on the left is a flow-chart based on a scenario of routine follow-up, and on the right is supporting information, including a link to the CATs. The algorithm refers to two assessment scales: the Parkinson’s Disease - Cognitive Functional Rating Scale (PD-CFRS) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA).

In constructing the algorithm, considerable importance was attached to the question of whether there is clinical suspicion of cognitive symptoms. This explains its appearance towards the top of the flow-chart. It should be noted, however, that this question could arise at any time during the clinical encounter. It is possible, therefore, that the flow-chart could be followed more than once during the consultation, and with a different outcome, depending on whether the matter of clinical suspicion has been revised.

 

To read more on the background to the development of this set of resources and to view the CATs, go to the CATs: Assessment of mild cognitive impairment page.