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Don't miss your chance to vote!

Parkinson's UK campaigner outside the Houses of Parliament with a placard saying 'People with Parkinson's vote'

We want everyone elected to Parliament to understand and prioritise the needs of people affected by Parkinson's.

So it's important that you vote in today's General Election - and make your voice heard.

If you can't get to your polling station or need some extra support in casting your vote, help is still available, even today - find out more below.

Where's my polling station and what do I need to vote?

Your polling station should be nearby. If you're not sure where it is, use this tool to find out.

It's important that you vote in today's General Election - and make your voice heard.

If you registered to vote before 22 May, you should have received a polling card in the post. If you have it, take it along to the polling station. But it's not mandatory - if you don't have it the staff at the polling station will just ask you to confirm your name and address instead.

The deadline to register to vote in this election passed on 22 May, so if you didn't register before then you won’t be able to vote today. However, you can still register now so you can vote in future elections.

Voting by proxy

If you or someone you know doesn't feel well enough to go to the polling station, you get an emergency proxy vote, allowing someone else to vote on your behalf, until 5pm today.

Find out more about emergency proxy votes

Support at the polling station

Staff at your polling station will be happy to help if you need advice or assistance.

If you or someone you know doesn't feel well enough to go to the polling station, you get an emergency proxy vote.

If you're not able to mark your ballot paper, you can ask for the Presiding Officer to do this on your behalf.

You can also bring someone to the polling station with you. They're allowed to help you as long as they haven't already helped more than 1 other person vote.

Polling stations can also provide a large print version of your ballot paper and 'tactile voting devices' which attach to the top of your ballot paper. These have numbered flaps directly over the boxes where you mark your vote.

Your polling station should be easy to access, whether you have Parkinson's or not. If not, your Presiding Officer should give you a ballot paper to let you vote outside the polling station.

What happens after the election?

Regardless of who wins the election, Parkinson's UK will work with all MPs for improved access to mental health and social care services, a fair benefits system and protection of research in the Brexit deal.

We'll get in touch with all MPs to welcome them to Parliament, brief them on key issues and invite them to join the All Party Parliamentary Group on Parkinson's.