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Early symptoms and resolution

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alexjohn
Early symptoms and resolution

I haven't been diagnosed yet. I am 47.

However my symptoms are/were :

Lack of sleep (waking up an hour after getting to bed, then trouble getting to sleep again), lurid dreams (which you remember because you wake up during them), deteriorating handwriting (signature all over the place), slowness of typing, orthostatic hypertension (dizziness when standing), starting to lose my sense of smell, constipation , declining voice ( terrible at singing and quieter) grumpy face and the beginnings of a tremor.  Some stiffness when getting out of the car.

Regime:
Mannitol (you absolutely must at least try this - yes it will make you runny, hold it in to exercise the vagus nerve. You can get it on the internet - it is not expensive), Exercise, Coconut oil, Low carb, high fat diet where possible. ( Imagine your brain has now become a diesel engine. Carbs is petrol. It can't cope with carbs).

Avoid milk especially skimmed and semi-skimmed (reduces uric acid levels). Cheese I think is OK.
Avoid sugar , biscuits, chocolate.
Exercise is absolutely key- Stationary bike. Gym when I have time. Need to do 50 minutes cardio + 40 minutes non-intense activity pretty much every day.
Social activities also help. Beer helps raise your uric acid levels. But not too much beer - alcohol can lower your magnesium levels which result is poor sugar control
Watch some comedy before bed. Read an historical novel which details how **** life was back in the 19th Century/ World War 1/India/France etc. Thank your lucky stars you were not born then. Or Syrian now.
Also take Vitamin b1 with coq10 - from wilkos, curcumin with pepper.
Vitamin D + K ( comes with calcium for some reason). Or go out into the sunlight at Midday and eat Brassicas
Take Magnesium Citrate as well.
Took Melatonin sometimes but not sure this helps that much or at all, so have stopped.

Current situation. Tremor gone, though may get some in the middle of the night if I have had a bad day previously (no excercise and hitting sugary snacks). Voice better. Face better. Sleep ok, but will still have vivid lurid dreams where I wake up after. Hypotension comes back with lack of exercise at work. Basically it is better if I don't eat any carbs before lunch. Smell restored. 

Most of this I think be ascribed to Mannitol - is about £36 for 2 kg from Blackburn distributions. Many on Healthunlocked are also showing good results from this. 

 

Island Mike

Hi Alexjohn, welcome to the forum.

Some of what you say may contain a grain of truth, but:

You say carbs are bad for the brain. This is utter nonsense, the only nutrient the brain uses is glucose, which, last time I looked, is a carbohydrate. Fats can’t pass through the blood brain barrier.

Mannitol works in the colon. The colon is innervated from the inferior mesenteric plexus, which is nothing to do with the vagus nerve, which terminates in the diaphragm.

Alcohol does not cause lowering of magnesium levels - if it did, most of the population would be suffering from hyomagnesemia which can be fatal. As they aren’t all dropping dead from acute cardiac disrhythmia, we can assume that alcohol just makes people drunk and ruins their livers.

Blood magnesium levels have nothing to do with glucose control.

There is no need to take additional vitamins if you eat a normal healthy diet. You certainly don’t need magnesium unless your levels are low- some medications can cause that, particularly Omeprazole.

And your improvement in symptoms can’t possibly be due to Mannitol - virtually none is absorbed by the intestine. That’s why it’s such a good laxative. You just poo it out. Used intravenously it can reduce intracranial pressure in head injuries, and eye pressure in acute glaucoma. Just swallowing it makes you poo.

Exercise is good, though, specially when you’re running to the toilet.

Alk the best

Mike

 

alexjohn

You say carbs are bad for the brain. This is utter nonsense, the only nutrient the brain uses is glucose, which, last time I looked, is a carbohydrate. Fats can’t pass through the blood brain barrier.

If you have a look at wiki (I know) the ketogenic diet we have this:

"Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source"

I have seen at least one person on youtube who has experience much improvement in their parkinson's symptoms using a ketogenic diet. However I admit that going Keto is extremely difficult for most.

You say: Blood magnesium levels have nothing to do with glucose control.

From this site I read:

https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/magnesium-the-forgotten-healer/

“Results from three very large studies indicate that people who consume a diet rich in magnesium have a lower risk of getting Type 2 diabetes.”

People with diabetes are more likely than those without to be low in magnesium. According to an article on About.com, “Elevated blood glucose levels increase the loss of magnesium in the urine, which in turn lowers blood levels of magnesium.” So getting enough magnesium is especially important in diabetes.

So I would say there is at least a chance that Magnesium has some impact on blood glucose.

And your improvement in symptoms can’t possibly be due to Mannitol - virtually none is absorbed by the intestine. 

That is your opinion

This from the clinicrowd website on Mannitol and Parkinson's - dated October 2017:

https://clinicrowd.info/introduction/

We can however already hint that we already see some statistics, such as :
88% regained sense of smell
70% improved and maintained quality of life
64% improve their energy and vitality level

This correlates to my experience. The important thing to note is that Clinicrowd gain no benefit from this stance - they are just reporting facts - as Mannitol is a cheap sugar there is no financial gain to be had. 

I have also come across several people on healthunlocked who have benefitted from Mannitol. 

Also Gary Sharp on http://www.outthinkingparkinsons.com/articles/mannitol

Since there appear to be more and more evidence that Parkinson's starts in the gut it is not unreasonable to think that it can also be stopped there. 

alexjohn

Alternatively the Mannitol could just be having a placebo effect. 

 

Island Mike

You say that it is my opinion that very little is absorbed from the gut. It is not my opinion, it is a fact. You are quite right, however, in mentioning the placebo effect. This is never measurable, but accounts for many PD treatments that are non-standard. 

You are also right to suggest that PD may start in the gut. This is becoming a theory of origin for many autoimmune disorders. However, flushing out your benign bacteria with Mannitol wouldn’t appear to be a wise move if that is the case.

And I still maintain that magnesium has no effect on blood glucose. I have been Type 1 diabetic for 21 years. When I became magnesium deficient due to medication, and when I was on treatment for it, my BG changed not a dot. There is no mention of magnesium on the Diabetes UK website or forum. Nor is altered BG listed as a symptom of magnesium deficiency. I note one responder on the website you pointed me to recommended putting magnesium salts in the bath, because magnesium is absorbed through the skin. Aye, right. If that were true nobody in a hard water area would get osteoporosis. But they do. As the magnesium is dissolved in the water, and skin is waterproof, it would seem futile to try it.

You have to be wary of any unofficial site, because they tend to be filled with non-peer reviewed research articles, or worse, anecdotal  tales. I drove a Peugeot 405 when I was diagnosed with diabetes. My older brother, who has driven Nissan for years, has no sign of diabetes. My younger brother drives Fords. No diabetes. What does that tell you? Absolutely nothing. Don’t confuse associations with causes or cures.

All the best 

Mike

.

alexjohn

One thing I find hard to believe though is that the 88% people reporting a restored sense of smell being a placebo effect. And if that is indeed a neurological benefit being reported surely it is possible there could be other actual benefits from taking the stuff?