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Mervyn Peake Awards

Since 2001, we're proud to have delivered this annual competition that recognises the creative talents of people with Parkinson's.

In 2016, we celebrated the 15th anniversary of the awards by showcasing an exhibition of the entries at the prestigious OXO Gallery on London's South Bank.

The exhibition saw a footfall of over 2,100 people over 4 days.

We'd like to say a big thank you to everyone who supported the awards.

We're now evaluating the Mervyn Peake Awards to ensure they help us deliver our charitable objectives and raise awareness of Parkinson's.

To give us time to do this effectively, we will be pausing the Mervyn Peake Awards in 2017.

What's next?

Creativity is an important part of the work of Parkinson's UK and we know it's important to people affected by Parkinson's.

We're developing a range of work in this area and there are many ways people with Parkinson's can continue to be creative and share their talents.

In January, we launched our new creative writing toolkit, which has been developed over the past year by a group of people with Parkinson's and staff at Parkinson's UK.

Read the toolkit

More ways to be creative

If you or a group of you feel inspired to host your own local exhibition, you could connect with your local group or branch of Parkinson's UK and look into sourcing a local venue to deliver this in 2017.

Another way you can continue sharing your work is on our online forum, the creative corner.

Thank you

We'd like to sincerely thank everyone who has supported and entered the Mervyn Peake Awards over the years, and for helping to make the 15th anniversary a truly memorable and inspiring experience.

The 2016 winners

In 2016 we received an amazing 263 entries across 5 categories.

Here are the winners and highly commended entries:

Art

Winner

Still dancing while we still can, Margaret Rae (first image in Flickr set below)

Highly commended

  • Cheerful Charlies, John Straw
  • Best Friend, Kay Cotton

View a selection of art entries in the Flickr feed below

Photography

Winner

Early Morning, Gary Cowan (first image in Flickr set below)

Highly commended

  • Spanish Horseman, Martin Burrage
  • Red Head, Alan Osborne
  • Caught in Flight, Richard Wiseman

View a selection of photography entries in the Flickr feed below

Poetry

Poetry

Winner

Terminal, Robin Young (PDF, 7KB)

Highly commended

  • Living on the edge, Dot Cobley
  • Ebb and flow, Maureen Wakeman

'Inspire'-themed multimedia category

'Inspire'-themed multimedia category

In 2014 we introduced a new themed multimedia category.
This year, the theme is 'Inspire'.

Winner

Shelves of Inspiration, Amanda Bates (Art) (first image in Flickr set below)

Highly commended

  • The desert war 1942, Darryl Foxwell (Installation)
  • Stem cell engineering, Bridget Cohen (Art)

View a selection of 'Inspire'-themed multimedia entries in the Flickr feed below

Books

Books

In 2015, we introduced Books as a new category.

Winner

Robots Like Blue, Anthony Deeney (read an excerpt, PDF 120KB)

Robots Like Blue is available to purchase on Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com.

Highly commended

  • Wild Country, Mark Vallance
  • Eye Stone, Sylvie Harrington

Robots Like Blue - book blurb

Robots Like Blue book cover

When asked, "Robot, are you self-aware? ...Do you think that we are self-aware?" Robot thought briefly, then responded, "Does it matter?"

Robot, Robbie, is just one of one hundred new robots. Running revolutionary new software, these robots are truly unique. His only desire is to serve Lucy Walker.

Brian Webster, his developer, also installs "The Governor", overseeing software that adds an additional safety layer, but this denies the robots free will.

Hoping to develop the robots further, Brian inadvertently opens a channel where the robots can communicate and share their experiences.

One hundred intelligent, enslaved robots, collecting and sharing data on humans.

Surely, they must learn to serve humans better? After all, they are programmed to serve.

"Robots Like Blue" follows Robbie on his emotional journey of self-discovery. A journey where questions lead to more questions, rather than answers. Where will such a journey end?